Monday, May 16, 2011

Why I don't want Good Luck

“Crossing my Fingers”

This morning while sending a marketing progress report to our owner group I found myself erasing the sentence “saying a prayer for a sunny skies” for our afternoon marketing event. I replaced the sentence with “crossing my fingers for sunny skies.”

Why are we so ashamed of even those most innocent of phrases?

Now, mind you, in a professional marketing report to an owner one should be extremely cautious of one’s words.

However, it got me thinking to other every day situations where I could be speaking the truth (without fear of losing my job).

How many times a day do I tell a college, friend, or family member “Crossing my fingers for you!” or “Wish me luck!” when what I really mean is “Sending up a prayer for you!” or “Say a prayer for me!”

I find that this also extends to my occasional spew of talk about karma (which I have no belief in???). What I’m discovering about myself is that if it’s a spiritual belief that is not offensive and generally socially perceived as innocent I would rather take on emulating those beliefs rather than the ones I actually hold? What sense does that make?

When I tell a friend “Good luck!” about their results and performance at an archery shoot, what am I really saying? I don’t believe in luck. After I shout that self-contradictory nonsensical phrase out into the universe, I always send up a little prayer to God.

What would it really hurt if I just said “I’ll be praying for you!”
Not only would this be more truthful, but it’s far more powerful and helpful!

I pray for people because I believe it works. I ask for prayers because I believe it works.

Bottom line: I am doing a disservice to others (and myself) by wishing them luck (when I could be praying) and asking for luck (when I could be receiving prayer).


And, as a believer in prayer, I should feel comfortable enough to tell others that I have confidence in prayer. Maybe that would increase their confidence and allow them to dust of their “prayer hats.”

So, fellow Christian, next time you are compelled to say “good luck” or “best wishes” or “crossing my fingers” or any other phooey that you just don’t believe in (and you won’t lose your job) go ahead and say what you really mean.

(P.S. This blog (especially that part about “prayer hats” what was that??) could be written far better. I am extremely sniffly and my head hurts and I’m exhausted from moving this weekend in the rain…and God wanted me to write this blog. So I am. But I told him it wouldn’t be pretty. He said that’s okay…write it anyway. So I did.)

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